click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20110701
20110731
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 45
LANGUAGE
English 45
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
under attack again. three explosions rocked india's financial capital, killing at least 21 people. and on at libya's front line, and to counter attack by colonel gaddafi's forces against rebels advancing on tripoli. >> you can hear it. ♪ >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also a round the globe. the last few days have brought in a credible reversal of fortune for rupert murdoch's media empire. today came another blow. public and political pressure, news corporation withdrew its bid for bskyb. it is another casualty of the hacking firestorm. now prime minister david cameron has announced details of a far- reaching inquiry into recent events. for more on how the deal went bust, here is the bbc business editor. a warning, there is some flash photography. >> rupert murdoch, the great news mogul, in the news for the wrong reasons. putting on a brave face before one of the great humiliations' of his career, the abandonment for his attempt to take over bskyb. here is the explosives didn't. we believe the proposed acquisition of bskyb by news corporation would benefit both
will wreck the climate and we will wreck the oceans. >>reporter: and big brand bikes mean business in india, as demand for luxury two wheelers revs up >>i walked into the mall and they had this showroom, i saw the bikes and i knew i had to get one. >>reporter: hello and welcome. i'm raya abirached and this is world business, your weekly insight into the global business trends shaping our lives. three decades of urbanization and economic reforms have lifted hundreds of millions of chinese out of poverty. the big concern now is how to keep feeding them. changing diet, increasing demand and tightening supply threaten the country's food security. it's a delicate balancing act and one that has implications for commodity markets worldwide. >>reporter: dragon spring village, in the hills above chongqing - where li xingming's family has worked the fields since the 19th century. >>before, our village never planted vegetables, only rice. now, we grow vegetables and we grow less rice, we just grow what we need. >>reporter: this growing and changing demand is coming from china's ever expanding cities -
you for talking to us. let's look at some of the other stories making headlines. in india, the authorities are blaming terrorists for three explosions on wednesday in the commercial capital of mumbai. 27 killed and dozens injured. the blast was in a densely populated part of mumbai. it has reawakened memories of the attacks in mumbai in 2008 in which 170 died. the home minister in india, p. chidambaram says the investigation will follow all leads. >> we are not pointing a finger at this stage at this group or that group. all leads will be followed without any pre determinations. no intelligence on the particular incident. intelligence is connected every day, every hour. there was no intelligence regarding an attack in mumbai. >> that was p. chidambaram talking in india. we are joined from delhi by a professor of strategic affairs. professor, these terrorists -- homegrown or foreign terrorists? >> the large bulk of incidents have been by foreign terrorists. homegrown terrorism has come down sharply in the last few years. i guess, if it is not homegrown, it would be from the
a brighter future for kenyan schoolchildren. >>and how adventure sports are making splash in india. >>extreme india... and the rest in just a moment on world business... >>reporter: around 85% of people in the world now pay to use a mobile phone, and in countries like kenya, where politics & geography can be a serious impediment to the roll out of fixed line internet connections, the mobile phone is playing an increasingly vital role. >>kenya is now a country connected. >>an astounding 99% of the internet traffic in kenya is done through mobile operators. >>there are 22 million mobile subscribers and although only 15% have mobile internet, even the humble text message is having a dramatic effect. >>if i want to maybe get the raw materials or maybe manure i can order them via my phone and i'll get them supplied. i can also pay whatever i have purchased, if it is the fertilisers, or the pesticides all of them. >>reporter: 31 million kenyans have no bank account, so the ability to buy and sell goods in even the most remote areas through person-to-person sms money transfers has made a huge differ
and women who agree to sterilization are being offered prizes, including cars. india is expected to have the largest population in the world by 2013. the mediterranean city state of monaco will witness the marriage of its ruling france friday. prince albert and his fiancee, a former south african olympic swimmer, will exchange bows and a civil ceremony. it is expected to cost around $80 million. people and morocco are voting today on a draft constitution for a -- proposed by king mohammed, two weeks after he outlined plans to increase the powers of the prime minister and parliament. critics say the vote has been called to quickly to allow proper debate. our report from morocco's capital. >> waving their flags, wearing traditional costumes and playing drums -- moroccans campaign for their upcoming referendum. supporters for the reform says the king has taken a great step towards a more open society. the king's reforms promise a stronger, more independent judicial branch, accountable government, and a focus on human rights and gender equality. >> as a moroccan, the new constitution is impo
verified, and i'm appalled. >> welcome to gmt. i am naga munchetty. 38 people are killed in india in a collision between a bus and a train. as america gets dangerously close to its borrowing limit, barack obama prepares to face congressional leaders in a pivotal round of talks. hello. it is midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, and early families of british soldiers who died in iraq and afghanistan have expressed shock and anger that their phones may have been hacked. personal details of bereaved relatives were found in the files of the private detective who intercepted voice mail messages for the "news of the world." news international, which owns the newspaper, said it would be appalled if there were any truth to the claims. >> "news of the world" prides itself on supporting british soldiers and the families of those who died on the front line. now it is alleged to have been responsible for hacking into the phones of some of those families. their phone numbers were found in the files of the private investigator. >> the families are very upset and disturbed. really upset. >>
is getting educated here and go back to india or china, then we will go to india and china so we can have those people working for us. >> he says the alchemy that help to make america great still insists that it is under threat. >> this is breakable and i don't think that americans in general understand how vulnerable it is and that represents a tremendous risk to the overall model. >> stanford university, it feels like a laid-back country club but this is the brain that feeds silicon valley. tuition fees have increased. despite appearances, they are plagued by a crisis of confidence. they're concerned with the really big question that dominated all of american politics. how do you regrouped project america when the government is running out of money and the people are no longer prepared to pay more in taxes? this man looks like your typical computer science professor. he could really do with a new bicycle. he can certainly afford it. in a light 90's, he had two students, an enterprising duo that promised him a share in their new business if he gave him their advice. how much are you actu
-- in india, investigators were ordered this week to open the vaults of a 16th century hindu temple where they discovered an estimated $22 billion worth of valuables -- bags of gold coins, jewels and gold statues of hindu deities. officials think much of the collection came from the royal family that once controlled the area. some argue the items should be given to charity, others say they belong to the temple. india's supreme court ruled that a museum should be set up to house the treasure.up >>> finally -- in conjunction with the dalai lama's visit to washington this week, tibetan monks are constructing a sand mandala, a symbolic structure that represents the buddha's dwelling and the idea of impermanence. in 2007, we visited auburn theological seminary in new york, to watch the building of a similar sand mandala, this one by monks from the dalai lama's private monastery in india. karen humphries sallick organized the monk's 2007 tour and explained the significance of the mandala practice. >> the mandala is a teaching and meditation tool so that we can focus on evoking in ourselves the
irish, today, the sisters from india, nigeria and the philippines. they're also older. one-third are well above retirement age. the oldest is 93. >> in the past decade, a dozen nuns have died. like most of the monastic communities, glencairn is smaller than it used to be. >> but six women are in formation, on the path to becoming nuns, far more than might be expected. only nine women entered religious orders in all of ireland in 2006, according to the most recent survey. >> i knew that people wouldn't be rushing in the door, but i am surprised at how occupied i am actually with inquiries from people of all different ages. people from 20 to late 60s, so is, and there are a steady flow of inquiries about this kind of life. >> several times a year the abby hosts monastic experience weekends for women of all ages who want to try it out. and they share the experience in more modern ways, too, on their web page, and even on facebook where they have picked up more than 400 fans. >>> i feel the monastic life has an enduring kind of appeal. i don't see it as part of the traditional
like northern china and in india where bore wells were used to irrigate greenrevolution crops. so we need a second green revolution; one that is also ecologically green as wellas yield green. >>reporter: how do you see the importance of investment into agriculture more? how can we do that down the road? >>we have a huge unmet challenge; we have to invest more in agriculture to get more per unit land area of using existing technologies better and we have to invest more in research and development to find better ways to grow the food that give good yield, but also resilience. and then there's one more piece of this puzzle; and it's a daunting puzzle. we are already in the era of climate change, sometimes we talk about climate change as hypothetical, or for the future. well climate change is real;it's not hypothetical and it's not only in the future, it's in the present. there's more climate instability, there are more hazards; like drought and like floods that are undermining the food supplynow, not just in the future and there's more to come. >>reporter: ...are we facing a doomsday sc
of the questions put to me all the time is asia, not where china is today or how india is emerging, but how is it that asia, all of it, vietnam, burma, slept, as it were, compared to the west, for all of history, and suddenly it is taking over? moon willpeople on the immun not be asian. they will be american. >> first of all, i think slept is not quite right. that is a very western, imperialists to view you british have. if you look around, high art has existed for hundreds of years in these societies. there's all kind of language, literature, stuff i cannot read, kind of thing. >> to make a very good point. >> of course, what we have seen is this radical change, and what most of us have seen in the west is the speed with which economic change has taken off. when i was in school, the question was why can these people not get it moving? well, they did. >> the softening of the economy was very important, and the fact that they decided they were going to become the manufacturing -- >> we also need to be aware of our loved/fiore of certain nations. ear of the -- love/f certain nations. it was t
, it is also right inthe heart of the high growth economies such as india, china and the regional grouping of asean... estimated by press metal to consume more than two-thirds of world production. >>the building of bakun dam, and other hydro-schemes in the so-called sarawak corridor of renewable energy (or score) has not been without controversy. 10,000 people were relocated when their traditional tribal land was flooded in the construction of bakun dam. conservationists have waged an intense campaign against the development; but community leaders also see advantages: >>uma belor: the school for instance is nearer which is wonderful for the children. and it's easieralso for us to communicate with the government as well. and we have clinics where we can go and other offices nearby. >>reporter: the international hydropower association is working with environmental champions such asthe world wildlife fund and has developed the hydropower sustainability assessment protocol to limit the social and environmental impacts. >>from canada, to china and the wilds of borneo... hydro power is attractin
the volume of water that one should drink. i heard a book by an indian that is india indian and not native american and saying you're not sick, you're thirsty. >> we do recommend eight or nine glasses of water a day. >> really for helping process your food, detoxifying, not for hydration. >> i think water's very important. >> yeah, well, we do talk about that. >> i think a liter before 10:00 in the morning. >> there's a whole chapter on that. >> early detection of cancer's quite fascinating, this book has fascinating -- i'm not trying to sell the book i just find here with the current interests that i've discovered in some programming that i was doing that antioxidant advances, free radical defenses, enzymes and antiobjection i dances, mark grossman, to what extent did you contribute to this book? i know that you're a coauthor but what is your particular content area? >> well, terry grossman here, and ray and i established a relationship a number of years ago and i became ray's personal physician and in the course of our conversations with one another, we created a compendium information t
play the role of a talyst. and you know what, when i do my research in india and pakistan, i find people there telling me that you know the way forward is going to be that you people in the west, you muslims living in the west, in north america and europe, you guys might be pave approximating the way. i said really, do you really want us to show you the way, we have a different economic system, different experience. said you can say whatever you want but whatever light are you going to shine on kick-starting the tradition is going to help us. we might not take everything you say. but we are too caught up in our indonesian struggles. and the other thing, charlie that we have in this country. we have possibly the most extraordinary resources, literal resources on islam and muss lim societies that no other country in the world has. e lrary at chicago, harvard's major library, princeton's library has terials an literary resources in arabi, petitionian, turkish, in every language. we have experts that can tell y about details about practices of islam in indonesia to timbuktu. and but t
ambassador to india. i ew none of the that. but i had the chance charlie to thank him from the bottom of my heart. he changed my lynch. and i have a son who i a teacher. teachesnglish in high school. and i'm so proud that that's what he's doing, so proud thatnt on the students he's teaching. and having, making his mark as a citizen, as a human being that way. >> charlie any regrets? >> me? >> charlie: yes. >> no. >> charlie: no. >> oh, some, of course. >> charlie: no great obsession, there's no great goal, there was no great sort of untain that you didn't climb. >> the best decision i ever made was to go to washington to though a job i had here in new york, good job, to the winds and go to washington in. new kennedy administration. when he said ask not what your country can do for you but wt youcan do for your country. i took that to hea. i went down and got a job at the usia when edward meryl was thee and opened upy life beyond journalism for me. at's when i found the photographs taken after the flood and i want to read more bit. i took books o and they didn't, they weren't very good.
of india, ford of china. but henry in order set ford up that way because he wanted t participate in the economies, not only provide people with great cars andruck but al is he be part ofñr the fabric of te economy in every part of which we operate. but he never anticipated they would operate completely independently. thereñ2hu8zÑi no syner and yet e were competing with the best anotigr reallyñr important thini found was thatñr because of our cost structure and the agreements we had we hadÑi made with usa, we uld not make kawrltzçó in the unitedtates. that's why we were focusing on usv's and trucks. if youÑi want toÑi pick it up, e weren't making cars them. we wereñr losingÑi money on alle brkn and a the models. and my first forecast thatÑi i shared in 2006 was a $17 billion loss for the year for 2006.çóñr plan andñr we needed to mov decisively. >> charlie: there's a story which has been repeated often. you're in a meeting with some of the executives who report to you and you saido em, are we doing anything wrong or mething like that. and they nobody raised their
enough. it's one that has a lot of acceptance in a lot of the world which china, india, brazil, and south africa accept make it work. >> rose: in your opinion china, >> >> yes. >> rose: you came away with what sense of their ambition? >> well, this is clearly a country with an enormous national will to... >> rose: solve internal problems? >> to develop, to become wealthy and powerful and to overcome what they see as a century and a half of national humiliation at the hands of the west. that's a huge drive. how it does that i think this is a country which sees many options and could go several different ways. i mean, the one thing almost everyone you speak in china agrees on the it's not going to have the same system in 20 year's time that it has today. whereas in the united states you think you have basically the same system that you've had for a few centuries and more. >> i think ai wei wei had said this. that you do not expect reform to comele from the generation that's now takingower that replaces hu jintao and wen jiabao but you expect genuine reform to come from the next generation,
in the world because you've got these rising powers, china, india, brazil, but we don't -- >> but we don't -- what they antarctica late, what we don't yet know is what they stand for. what is their big idea. what are these now powers going to bring to the world. so everybody is still lookinto america for the leadership and ashomas sa america is still the tent pole but europeans and everyone, i think, are asking can where is u.s. headed it cannot gone with these levels of deficits and debt. mething has to be done but the one thing president obama has not articulated is some broad vision for the united states to compete in the world. energy is one very obvious area tha tom writes a lot about. i was recently in copenhagen, in copenhagen they are now heeding the entire city this winter, last winter by burning their own gar badge. there are dramatic changes going on. why is green technolog being lead by scandinavia, by asia. and that vision is just lacking. >> let me open that up with everybody. the idea of obama leadership, i mean as did has said is not acted boldly where he might have want
as opped to fundamentals. the emerging markets, developing markets, gynea-- china, brazil, india all have better growth prospects in terms of a rather underdeveloped consumer sector and the ability to grow from that standpoint versus the developed markets. in addition they have trillions of dollars worth of reserves whereas the developed countries are in hawk to those nations so from those standpoints the developing countries are in much better shape going forward over the next five to ten years as opposed to the developed. >> gillian? >> onef the most interesting things that moodies said this week when it gave warning that it might downgrade the u.s. debt fm aaa was that it was leaving the ratings of companies, large american companies unchanged. and essentially the underlying, somethg you are already seeing in market prices where in the markets right now the risk attacks to sereign debt is actually higher than some of the big, solid american companies or similar patent in europe as well. and that's very unusual. but essentially what moodies was saying and what you are seeing in the mark
took her first trip as secretary of state to asia. >> rose: and she's back in india as we speak. since dean rusk in 1961. and we have really engaged... they want u.s. presence. i think the asians want to see the unitedtates engaged and, by the way, they want us to manage the relationship with china in a positive constructive way. >> rose: can the chinese fear that we're... want to be too big a player in the region and looking the secretary speech in vietnam, for example? >> that's a gd questionnd one that's debated in china and i'd answer it this way. the chinese recognize-- and i've spent a lot of time with the leaders of china over the last too and a half years and that's a very interesting article published boy their state counselor and for your viewers who dot have the chinese foreign ministry on their list serve, you can rea about this in the last chapter of henry kissinger's book "on china." a fascinating discussion. >> rose: he's the most prominent person in chinese foreign policy and he was a participant in the dialogues. >> exactly. so there's a debate in china about this. bu
of china and india and the economic growth of those emerging nations. it has to do with the fact that technology s no respect for boundaries which we are discovering in the middle east right now, right. >> absolutely. >> where do you come down on that in terms of america because you're leaving america. >> yh. america h ha great natural resources, huge amount of land and that's been extremely important in its growth. but it also has respeed science and innovation. and we see great growth areas. i mean california and in the boston area in particularly and i think america recognizeds the importance of human capital. i think that's intellectual capital and the generation of ideas. but it needs more nurturing. i mean science education in the u.s. is not up to scratch. >> what does that mean not up to scratch. >> it'just not generating enough educated individuals either those that would actually go into science which is what we're mainly talking about here, but also producing an educated population who can actually coribute making decisions in democracy that are increasingly going to
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)